Partners in Forestry Landowner Cooperative

 

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Partners in Forestry Landowner Cooperative

 

6063 Baker Lake Road
Conover, WI 54519
 
715 - 479 - 8528
partnersinforestry@gmail.com

 

"For global good, use local wood"

 


Partners in Forestry (PIF) is grateful to be recognized by our peers and colleagues for our conservation efforts in the Northwoods of Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula. This leadership award, from Gathering Waters: Wisconsin’s Alliance for Land Trusts, is named after the late (former) DATCP Secretary Rod Nilsestuen, and is greatly appreciated and fitting as we benefitted from an ongoing working relationship with the Secretary that included a working lands meeting with him in Vilas County in 2008. Read more about PIF conservation efforts in land preservation and the Gathering Waters working land preservation award.


 

If you like the progress Partners in Forestry is making on important northwoods issues, such as the new Legacy Forest near Land O' Lakes, consider being a part of our important work by becoming a member.

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Partners in Forestry Landowners Coop (PIF), serving north central Wisconsin and western U.P., is dedicated to providing information, educational opportunities, and sustainable forest management for its members (Our Mission and Goals)  

 

News from PIF: 

NEW November 2017 Topics: A Little Bit from Joe; Concerns for the Earth; Concerns for the Earth (articles reprinted from outside sources); Deck The Halls; Wild Raisins and Smelly Socks; Vengeful Veggies (Plants that Burn); Forget About Reforestation; WANT BIRDS? Native Trees and Shrubs are the answer; Shared Love of the Land; Tips for Landowners; Woods on County Grounds Zoning as Parkland Letter; One of My Favorite Places to Visit in the Northwoods; Inhabitants of the Upper Wisconsin River Legacy Forest Pictures; Wood: If not wood what would we use?; Wisconsin Forests Have Economic Value. How Much?

NEW  Evidence of damage from exotic invasive earthworm activity was highly correlated to sugar maple dieback in the Upper Great Lakes region.  Sugar maple in the western Upper Great Lakes region has recently been reported with increased crown dieback symptoms, prompting investigation of the dieback etiology across the region. Evaluation of sugar maple dieback from 2009 to 2012 across a 120 plot network in Upper Michigan, northern Wisconsin, and eastern Minnesota has indicated that forest floor disturbance impacts from exotic invasive earthworms was significantly related to maple dieback. Click here to read the full article.

NEW  Death and Taxus: the high cost of palatability for a declining evergreen schrub. In forest ecosystems woody shrubs face many challenges in the struggle for survival and growth. In addition to coping with the high-shade environment of the forest floor, in many systems shrubs have to contend with the presence of mammalian herbivores. Since these understory inhabitants spend their entire existence within the reach of browsers, they must carefully balance the allocation of limited resources among maintenance, growth, and defense. When nutrients and light are readily available, fast-growing species rapidly regrow tissues to compensate for herbivore consumption, but if resources are limited, investment in defense may be the preferred option. Click here to continue to read article.

Extensive Canada Yew on Pilgrim River property

 

Articles on the ecology, distribution, conservation and management of large old trees:  2017 Conserving large old trees as small natural features - BiolCons;  2016 The unique challenges of conserving large old trees - TrendsEcolEvol;  2016 The ecology, distribution, conservation and management of large old trees - BiolRev DOI;  2014 New Policies for Old Trees: Averting a Global Crisis in a Keystone Ecological Structure - ConsLett

In many areas of the United States, the population density of white-tailed deer has dramatically increased over the past century to levels that are significantly greater than presettlement estimates.  Prolonged and selective overbrowsing by deer has strong impacts on population-and community-level processes. Here are several "Deer browse impact research papers":   "The legacy of deer overabundance: long-term delays in herbaceous understory recovery";    "Historic disturbance regimes promote tree diversity only under low browsing regimes in eastern deciduous forest";    "Chronic over browsing and biodiversity collapse in a forest understory in Pennsylvania:  Results from a 60 year-old deer exclusion plot";    "Deer herbivory reduces web-building spider abundance by simplifying forest vegetation structure";    "On the formation of dense understory layers in forests worldwide: consequences and implications for forest dynamics, biodiversity, and succession"

 

The Wildlife Society Policy Brief Series on The Land and Water Conservation Fund.   The Land and Water Conservation Act was passed and signed into law September 3, 1964 by President Lyndon B. Johnson creating the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The LWCF is now the primary source of money used by federal, state, and local governments to acquire lands for conservation and public access to natural areas. Click here to read more on the Land and Water Conservation Act.

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior by Rachel Hovel, University of Washington, Office of News and Information, January 18, 2017   Rachel Hovel, who has done a lot of good work for both PIF and Northwoods Alliance, was recently recognized by the University of Washington when her article, Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior was published. The article concerns one of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species, the Three-spine stickleback, which is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change. This could impact the ecology of northern lakes, which already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. Click here to read Rachel's entire article.
 

DNR to sell 10,000 acres of land in several phases

Partners in Forestry is a landowner based COOP dedicated to sustainable forest management and advocacy for all the benefits proper forest management provides to society. As you may recall from our work in bringing you (for approval) the Upper Wisconsin River Legacy Forest just one year ago, we are passionate about the public values these conservation projects bring to the people of Wisconsin. We are most in our role in promoting positive goals for real benefits, but at times we are called to an opposition position.

We have, of course, known for some time about the directive for DNR to sell 10,000 acres of land in several phases. I personally had hoped our positive projects would subdue most vocal opposition from our membership about this ongoing process. Recently however, perhaps more related to the logistics of this recent phase or perhaps the cumulative negativity of the idea overall, I have heard a tremendous amount of rancor, strong opposition and bewilderment from our membership, our out side network and the public at large.

 Please strongly consider the long term repercussions from this proposal, and how it affects the economic, social, environmental and intrinsic benefits these very lands provide to the public. Our citizens are in far too a polarized state of mind these days as it is, to loose a public access, to loose a favorite hunting or fishing spot, or to later discover how important these lands may have been to a wildlife species or for some revelation we can not now grasp will only create more public distrust.

We are in strong opposition to this current phase, based on the volumes of comments we have received in recent weeks.

Thank you for considering our position,

Joe Hovel

Acting Director and President

Partners in Forestry Landowner Cooperative

Wisconsin’s Forest Legacy Program identifies and protects, through the use of conservation easements, environmentally important private forestlands threatened with conversion. Properties in the program stay under private ownership and management. Wisconsin's aim is to protect large blocks of forestland that are managed for the sustainable use of forest resources and that offer public recreation opportunities in order to preserve the integrity of the state’s forests.  Click here for a summary of the Upper Wisconsin River Legacy Forest Legacy program.  Any questions on this project can be directed to Joe Hovel at partnersinforestry@gmail.com. 

Partners in Forestry was asked to present a program titled ‘DEFORESTATION, proper and improper forest management and conversion of forest lands’ to the Sayner-St. Germain Fish and Wildlife Club on Thursday, June 23rd. This is the presentation made by Joe Hovel.

Impacts of deer on northeastern forests and strategies for control. Deer have been shown to cause significant negative impacts to forest regeneration in northeastern forests. Chronic over-browsing reduces both plant and animal abundance, and these legacy effects can last long after deer numbers are reduced. Landowners should manage deer numbers on their property at levels the forest can sustain. Aggressive hunting programs, or in some cases deer damage permits, may be needed to lower deer numbers and impacts to acceptable levels. There is no quick and easy solution unless deer can be fenced out of regeneration areas, and this usually is not economically feasible. In many parts of NYS, if landowners do not manage deer, then successful forest regeneration of diverse hardwood trees is unlikely. Presented by Dr. Paul Curtis, Cornell University Department of Natural Resources. This is the presentation by Dr. Curtis.

The state is going backwards for the timber industry and sportsman.

The timber products industry and sportsmen should be extremely concerned with DNR land sales as directed by law under this political climate. Both have high interest in preventing parcelization. For example, the new owner of a recent DNR land sale near Boulder Junction (outside NHAL boundary) plans the following: clearcut mature pines, put up a storage unit facility, and sell one-acre lots. This is the final timber harvest on these 40 acres. Likewise the scattered 40s and 80s in St. Germain that are up for sale will, in a few years, be subdivided into small parcels for sale as home sites and the timber will never again be managed and sportsmen will never again have access. It really is sad.

Partners in Forestry participated in the 'Wild Life and Reconciliation Conference' at the Ho Chunk conference center in Baraboo, Wis. on July 16.

The following presentation on Forest Legacy and it's value to Wis. wildlife was written by Joe Hovel, with editing and slides prepared by Rachel Hovel Phd., with presentation by Dick Steffes. Click here for the presentation

Protecting your wooded land for the future is essential to clean water, clean air, wildlife habitat, sustainable wood supply...all things that are necessary to society and health, and that are gone forever if the land is developed.